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Carrer de Joan Güell, 108, 08028 Barcelona
934 09 06 47
info@clinicadentaloris.com www.clinicadentaloris.com
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Oris has earned the trust of some major companies.

Companies that can see for themselves the guarantees, service, experience and quality that our experts offer.






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Corporate Social Responsibility


Fully aware of the current economic situation and growing social needs, in 2005 Clínica Dental Oris initiated its charitable work so that patients with low incomes could be seen at our clinic.

Every year, we treat dozens of patients who have been referred from the Social Services centre at Les Corts. Clínica Dental Oris covers the cost of virtually all these treatments.

In this way, we hope to contribute to the welfare of people who are experiencing financial difficulties in our neighbourhood so that they can enjoy good oral and dental health. At Clínica Dental Oris, we enjoy helping our neighbours.


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The medical team one by one


Dr Laia Chacón Canut (lic. no. 3996)
Medical director
BSc Dentistry
Postgraduate in Oral Prosthetics
Postgraduate in Cosmetic Dentistry
Dr Ignasi Chacón Canut (lic. no. 4.699)
Medical director
BSc Dentistry
Postgraduate in Oral Prosthetics
MSc Orthodontics
Diplomaed in Orthodontics from the
Charles H.Tweed Foundation
2009 (Tucson, USA.)
Specialist in Invisalign
Specialist in lingual orthodontics
MSc Invisible Orthodontics
Platinium Invisalign Doctor
Exclusive practitioner of orthodontics
Dr Nuria Bertos Quílez (lic. no. 4942)
BSc Dentistry
MSc Periodontics
Dr Beatriz de Tapia, (lic. no. 2801853)
BSc Dentistry
MSc Periodontics
Dr Xavier Martínez Fuster (lic. no. 34992)
BSc Medicine
Specialist in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Dr Ignasi Chacón Canut (lic. no. 4.699)
Medical director
BSc Dentistry
Postgraduate in Oral Prosthetics
MSc Orthodontics
Diplomaed in Orthodontics from the
Charles H.Tweed Foundation
2009 (Tucson, USA.)
Specialist in Invisalign
Specialist in lingual orthodontics
MSc Invisible Orthodontics
Platinium Invisalign Doctor
Exclusive practitioner of orthodontics
Dr Andrea Moreno Bosch (lic. no. 4499)
BSc Dentistry
MSc Paediatric Dentistry
Dr Sandra Oliver i Laguna (lic. no. 5138)
BSc Dentistry
MSc Paediatric Dentistry
Dr Clara Duarte Fernández-Dueto (lic. no. 5444)
BSc Dentistry
MSc Endodontics
Dr Elsa Ramis Domínguez (lic. no. 3969)
BSc Dentistry
Postgraduate in Cosmetic Dentistry
Dr Pamela Marrero Ruiz (lic. no. 4726)
BSc Dentistry
MSc Oral Prosthetics and TMJ

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Pregnancy and infants

Hormonal alterations that occur during pregnancy increase the risk of gum disease.

Carefully brush your teeth at least twice a day with a soft-bristled toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste.

Clean between the teeth daily with dental floss.

Tell your dentist if you are pregnant and about any changes in medication.

Remember that X-rays during pregnancy carry a risk.

See your dentist for regular check-ups.

Paediatric dentistry

Dra. Andrea Moreno Bosch Col.4.499 / Dra. Sandra Oliver i Laguna Col.5.138

The paediatric dentistry service at Clínica Dental Oris provides a comprehensive dental health service for children in an environment that they like. We work hard to make their visit to the dentist a positive experience and we use special behavioural techniques in our bedside manner.

The paediatric dentists at Oris are specially trained in this branch of dentistry. They are experts in the prevention and treatment of mouth and teeth problems in children. It is important that children understand how to maintain good dental health from a very early age.

Paediatric dentistry tips

Check out all our tips for good dental health in children.

Injuries
What to do in the event of a blow to a milk tooth?
What to do in the event of a blow to adult tooth?
New teeth
Does it hurt when milk teeth are coming out?
When are the milk teeth replaced by the permanent teeth?
Is it painful when the new teeth are delayed in coming out?
Pregnancy and infancy
Pregnancy and oral hygiene
Caries
Why look after milk teeth?
What risks does it entail for the child?
Should milk teeth with caries be filled?
What is a space maintainer?
How can caries be prevented?
Baby’s bottle and caries
Diet
Avoid habits
Breast milk
Excessive consumption of carbohydrates
Avoid eating foods with sugar
Frequency of sugar consumption
Encourage your child to eat a healthy diet
Fluoride
Fluoride mouthwash
Fluoride tablets
Professional topical products

Injuries

In the event of a blow to the mouth, visit the paediatric dentist immediately to get a diagnosis and the appropriate treatment. The child must be examined and X-rayed.

When a milk tooth is affected, it can turn black. We will follow up with regular check-ups to avoid later complications (pulp necrosis, abscesses, cellulitis, etc.).

The adult tooth that comes out later may also have sequelae: yellow or brownish staining, problems with the root or poor positioning. These issues can be detected and treated when the tooth emerges.

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What to do in the event of a blow to a milk tooth?

If the tooth is fractured, it is reconstructed with a white substance (composite).

If the nerve has been affected, we will treat it with a procedure known as pulpotomy and then reconstruct the broken fragment.

If the tooth falls out completely (avulsion), a prosthesis is fitted in order to regain tooth function and improve the child’s appearance. Some very young children do not tolerate this. Milk teeth are never re-implanted.

If the tooth is wobbly, the child must get regular check-ups. It may be necessary to extract the tooth. Milk teeth are never splinted.

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What to do in the event of a blow to adult tooth?

Depending on how badly affected it is, one of the following procedures may be performed:
Part of the tooth is fractured: cosmetic reconstruction.
The nerve is affected: endodontics and cosmetic reconstruction.
The tooth is wobbly: immediate splinting (within 24 hours).
The tooth falls out: re-implantation and splinting.

Urgent steps to take if an adult tooth falls out.

  • Keep the tooth in something damp: a glass with saline solution or milk or the mouth itself. Never wrap it in a towel or tissue.
  • Do not touch the root area of the tooth.
  • Try to put the tooth back in its place after cleaning it with milk or saline solution
  • See the paediatric dentist immediately.
  • We’ll perform the appropriate procedures and follow-up.

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New teeth

At what age do the first teeth come out?

At 6 months, the two lower central incisors first appear. At around 30-36 months, all 20 milk teeth will have come out. They will remain until the age of 6.

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Does it hurt when milk teeth are coming out?

Yes, this natural process is uncomfortable and somewhat painful for the baby. The most common symptoms are: increased drooling that may cause some diarrhoea, irritability, problems sleeping, rejection of food and a tendency to chew on hard objects. Teething does not cause a fever. If the child has a high temperature, see the paediatrician to find out why.

What to do to relieve this discomfort?

This discomfort can be relieved by chewing on a cold object. Analgesic products are available in pharmacies. You must never rub or cut the gums.

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When are the milk teeth replaced by the permanent teeth?

This change occurs in two stages:

Between the ages of 6 and 8, the four upper and lower incisors and the primary molars come in.

Between the ages of 10 and 12: the premolars, canines and permanent molars come in.

Around age 18: the wisdom teeth come in.

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Is it painful when the new teeth are delayed in coming out?

Each child has their own “biological clock”.  It is considered normal for teeth to come out up to one and half years early or late. Later we shall discuss “early or late dentition”. At our clinic we provide regular check-ups and, if necessary, X-rays to assess your child’s dental development.

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Pregnancy and infancy

Dental care of infants

Clean their gums and tongue with a piece of gauze after every meal, wiping off any traces of milk and other foods.

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Pregnancy and oral hygiene

The hormonal changes that occur in pregnancy increase the risk of gum disease.

Carefully brush your teeth at least twice a day with a soft-bristled toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste.

Clean between your teeth every day with dental floss.

Tell your dentist if you are pregnant and about any changes in medication. Having X-rays taken during pregnancy carries a risk.

See your dentist for regular check-ups.

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Caries

Bacterial plaque produces acids from the food that we eat, which can attack tooth enamel. Even though enamel is the hardest substance in our bodies, it can be dissolved by these acids. The lesions that are caused (caries) increase in size and this can lead to the loss of the tooth.

At Clínica Dental Oris we know that, while tooth decay is a problem that has improved in Spain, almost 100% of 12 year olds have had caries at some point.

In 12-year-olds with permanent teeth, there has been a significant decrease in the prevalence of caries, from 68% in 1993 to 43% today. The situation is very similar for 15-year-olds. The percentage of these children with caries has practically halved.

Among young adults (aged 35-44), there has been no change in the prevalence of caries, although we are seeing a decrease in serious cases. Today 8.4% have caries, compared with 10.9% in 1993. In people aged 65 to 74 we are also seeing a significant decrease, from 21.1% in 1993 to 18.1% today.

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What causes it?

The main causes are lack of hygiene and too many sugary snacks eaten between meals and before bedtime. This leads to the formation of bacterial plaque, a white plaque that adheres to the tooth and is made up of numerous bacteria; if it calcifies it is known as tartar.

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Why look after milk teeth?

In milk teeth, caries stops food from being properly prepared for digestion, and nutrients are poorly assimilated during the most important stage of physical growth.

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What risks does it entail for the child?

Mouth infections (gum boils) can carry bacteria through the bloodstream and produce bacterial endocarditis, rheumatic fever or kidney problems.
Lack of space for permanent teeth.
Toothache.
Sensitivity when consuming hot and cold food and drink.
Gum inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontal disease (periodontitis).

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Should milk teeth with caries be filled?

Always. Caries can cause long-term infections that are harmful for the health of the child. To make it easier to detect caries, children should visit the dentist every 6 months.

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What is a space maintainer?

If it is too late to save a milk tooth, it must be extracted. A small contraption known as a space maintainer has to be fitted into the gap to save the space for the future permanent tooth.

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How can caries be prevented?

With good brushing, a good diet, fluoride, fissure sealants and regular check-ups at our clinic. It is important to adopt good habits at a very early age, as young children learn and assimilate them faster.

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Baby’s bottle and caries

Leaving a baby in the cot with a bottle that has milk in it (even if it’s breast milk) or any type of formula or juice can cause caries. If your baby needs the comfort of a bottle to fall asleep, fill it with water..

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Diet

Avoid habits

Putting sugar or honey on a baby’s dummy or letting him keep the teat of the bottle in his mouth all night. This leads to baby bottle caries or “bottle rot” in milk teeth.

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Breast milk

Breast milk is the ideal form of nourishment in the first few months of life. Breast milk is rich in lactose, which is less damaging to teeth than formula milk, which contains sucrose.

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Excessive consumption of carbohydrates

This is the most important dietary factor when it comes to dental caries. In particular, sticky sugary foods such as sweets, biscuits, corn puffs and sugared drinks.

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Avoid eating foods with sugar

Between meals and before bedtime. While you’re asleep, your defence mechanisms (such as saliva and mouth and lip movements) are reduced.

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Frequency of sugar consumption

This is more important than amount of sugar consumption. If you have a real craving for sweet foods, it is better to eat them with meals and then brush your teeth afterwards.

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Encourage your child to eat a healthy diet

Replace sweets with fruit, sandwiches and nuts. You don’t need to ban eating sweets but you do need to teach them that sweet foods are an occasional treat. They have to learn to have a balanced diet with a wide range of nutrients.

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Fluoride

Fluoride toothpaste

This is not enough to fight caries. It has to be used alongside mouthwash and professional topical products.
Child-friendly flavours encourage them to brush.
In children aged 3 and over: give them an amount the size of a grain of rice. For children aged 9 and over: give them a pea-sized amount.

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Fluoride mouthwash

There are daily mouthwashes with a 0.05% concentration of fluoride and weekly mouthwashes with a 0.02% of fluoride. The latter are used in dental health campaigns in schools. The ideal time is just before bedtime. The effectiveness of the mouthwash depends on how well the teeth have been brushed beforehand and on whether milky drinks are avoided (the calcium cancels out the effect of the fluoride) and any other foods are consumed after brushing.

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Fluoride tablets

These are prescribed by paediatricians. The dose has to be adjusted to the child’s age. Given to children up to the age of 6, when the formation and calcification of the permanent teeth is complete.

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Professional topical products

Highly concentrated fluoride gel that is applied with mouth trays that fit the child’s mouth. It is a procedure carried out by the dentist at the clinic. Aged 6-16. 1 session is given every 6 months.

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